Linda Dyson

After many years living abroad, including 21 years in Greece, Linda returned to UK to marry her husband in 2001 and quickly joined a creative writing class in order to reignite her long held desire to write. She had ‘played about’ with poetry and short stories, including children’s stories in the past. On its inception, she joined Corinium Radio as a presenter of three different programmes including one called ‘Write Out Loud’.

Linda joined Somewhere Else Writers in an attempt to get back into writing a novel she had started several years earlier. Two stories have been published in an anthology organised by the ‘Aspiring Writers’ group on ‘Linked In’ and a number of poems included in other anthologies. A play has been broadcast on Corinium Radio and works for children performed at Watermoor School and/or in Frampton Mansell where she lives.


Linda has included the first scene of her radio play, The Piano.

The Piano

Jim (aged about 70)

Mrs Patel

Jessie (Tom’s neighbour)

Mick

Cathy – Jim’s daughter

Anna/Andy – Jim’s young granddaughter/grandson

Pete – Jim’s older grandson

Tom – Pete’s friend

Talent show host/hostess

SCENE ONE – MRS PATEL’S CORNER SHOP.

(Sound of shop door bell ringing – shop door opening and closing)

JIM

Morning, Mrs Patel – morning, Jessie. I’ve got a little advert if you’d be able to put it in the window for me.

MRS PATEL

Morning, Jim. What’s this?   ‘Wanted,  grand piano, up to £800 on offer’.  Who’s that’d be wanting a grand piano?

JIM

Why me, of course! Didn’t you know I used to play a lot in my youth?

MRS PATEL

But where are you going to put it in that little flat of yours?

JIM

I’ll find room for it somewhere – chuck out the settee if necessary.

JESSIE

And how’ll you get it up those three flights of stairs might I ask?

JIM

I’ll figure something out. Where there’s a will there’s a way.

JESSIE

And how did you come by £800 if you don’t mind my asking? Did you win the lottery or something?

JIM

Nope, my dear old Auntie Margery just died aged 97 and she left me a £1,000 – so now at last I can make my dream come true. One of the saddest days of my life that was when I had to get rid of the old piano – what with being laid off all of a sudden and four mouths to feed.  I always swore that when I could I’d get another one. But I never had a chance – not till now, that is.

JESSIE

And what does your daughter say about it?

JIM

Cathy? She doesn’t  know yet, but it’s none of her business, anyway. I’m   her Father – not her son to be nagged at.

MRS PATEL

Well you seem quite sure about it- so I’ll put this in the window. That’ll be  50 p. please . I’ll leave it there for a month. Was there anything else?

JIM

Not right now, thanks. 

(Sound of coins exchanging hand and till ringing.)

JIM

Thanks a lot. Tarra, ladies!

MRS PATEL

Have a good day.

JESSIE

Bye!

(Sound of door opening and closing with shop bell ringing. The two women burst out laughing.)

JESSIE

Crazy! How will he ever be able to put a grand piano up there? And how will I be able to stand the noise through those paper thin walls?

MRS PATEL

I shouldn’t worry too much, Jessie. I shouldn’t think there’s too many people round here selling off a grand piano! He’ll probably forget about it after a few weeks with no success!

JESSIE

Yes, and that daughter of his will probably talk sense into him. Takes after her mother-got her head screwed on straight.

(They laugh again as sound fades)

 

More of Linda’s writing can be found in the Cirencester Scene page and Cirencester Scene Archives.